Footing

Thanks as always to Rochelle for Friday Fictioneers. Sorry I’m late; this time I have a real excuse 😉 .

 

PHOTO PROMPT © J Hardy Carroll

Footing

“What happened?”

I shake my head, shrug, wince.

Truthfully, she did that thing we never believe anyone is capable of: she changed. Not overnight, during a year, seemingly unnoticeable. Like days after the summer solstice, her light gradually dwindled.

“Snap out of it,” I’d said. I got impatient. This moping wasn’t her. “Snap out of it.”

Annoyed, I ignored the way she crawled into herself, as if she’d lost her footing. I ignored how she seemed invisible at home. I had work. I was busy. If she couldn’t make the effort, why should I?

So I left her alone.

 

end

Sascha Darlington 7/9/2018

10 Comments

  1. Slipping slowly into depression is an invisible process, at first, when the signs appear people don’t recognise them. Even the afflicted can’t tell until they lose control – look in the mirror, do you trust the person you see, after all they are all you’ve got. Self esteem grows with self respect.
    Well! that’s what I got from your story, perhaps I am being too involved and over thinking, still it was an enlightening read, provoking thoughtful reflection.

  2. The last line is heart breaking. Depression is a stealthy danger. Great take on losing the footing. I admit that my reaction to depression, many, many years ago, was similar. Snap out of it. It’s good that there is a lot more information now (although not yet enough) and it’s recognized as a disease, not a mood. Help is needed, not looking away.

    1. Yes, I agree totally with you. Thanks to research and modern medicine we now know a lot more about what the body and mind are doing. And, yes, it is stealthy. A shift in body chemistry and a normally cheerful person can change.
      Thanks for reading and providing such a wonderful comment!

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