Seize the Day or Even Just a Moment

Yesterday was one of those days that made me reflect. It started by reading about the tornadoes that swept through Alabama and Georgia and the lives lost and irrevocably changed.

This led to my finally writing my story for Carrot Ranch, All the Time, a consideration of how we think we have all the time in the world.

After this I watched a metaphorical train wreck occur on FB, the setting for most online drama, as a fledgling writer melted down after another author gave her a 2-star review.

And then I heard that 52-year old Luke Perry died. So young.

Every day we are told how to live our lives:

“Travel more because traveling is the most rewarding experience in the world!”

“Buy this product–it will make you a better you!”

” Eat this!” “Be seen here!” “Be beautiful! “Be thin!” “Be muscular!”

There’s an endless list of improvements for you and to your world, but the one advert you may never see is: Be present. It costs no money. You don’t have to go anywhere. You just have to be in the moment and appreciate what you have.

The one thing about being present is that it’s hard, especially when we’re constantly besieged with how to live better, how to be better. Most, if not all, of these things entail money. But being present is free. It just means you get up in the morning, appreciate the people, pups, kitties, fish, birds, or what have you, around you, be grateful for them. Appreciate that you’ve got another day with seemingly limitless possibilities. Another day to write that novel, run a mile, walk around the block, learn something new…whatever it is that rocks your world…or that you want to rock your world.

A few minutes ago I took brief stock and here’s what unfolded:

Too often lately we receive reminders of how short life is. Make the most of it. Every day.

It’s time for me to go give hugs and play.


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13 replies »

  1. Great reminder, Sascha 🙂 It is absolutely true that we often forget the simplest of things! To “be” is already so special, and we just spoil it by trying to change “how to be”.

      • Very true! If we weren’t told how we ”should” be all the time, we’d most likely live much simpler lives. I don’t know about you, but I realize that as the years pass by, I am less and less influenced by all of this. And I am glad I don’t care as much about superficial details as I used to, when I was younger 🙂

      • Yes. I found it also helped to get off from my personal FB page where everyone is living THE life that I’m supposed to emulate. hehe That is one way in which social media has not been a good friend to humanity. 🙂

  2. I agree, Sascha, well expressed, and a lovely warm series of photos. The Buddhists have kind of given up on me, but I’m hoping to get back to mindful presence, even if it’s just sitting still and staying with my breathing for a minute (like 6 breaths) at times through the day.

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