Review of Hidden

Hidden
The Texas Murder Files

Laura Griffin

August 25, 2020

Berkley


Blurb: An ambitious female reporter tracks a deadly threat in Austin, Texas, in the newest riveting thriller by New York Times bestselling author Laura Griffin.

When a woman is found brutally murdered on Austin’s lakeside hike-and-bike trail, investigative reporter Bailey Rhoads turns up on the scene demanding access and answers. She tries to pry information out of the lead detective, Jacob Merritt. But this case is unlike any he’s ever seen, and nothing adds up. With the pressure building, Jacob knows the last thing he needs is a romantic entanglement, but he can’t convince himself to stay away from Bailey.

Bailey has a hunch that the victim wasn’t who she claimed to be and believes this mugging-turned-murder could have been a targeted hit. When she digs deeper, the trail leads her to a high-tech fortress on the outskirts of Austin, where researchers are pushing the boundaries of a cutting-edge technology that could be deadly in the wrong hands.

As a ruthless hit man’s mission becomes clear, Bailey and Jacob join together in a desperate search to locate the next target before the clock ticks down in this lethal game of hide-and-seek.

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It has been awhile since I’ve finished a book in one evening, but there was no way I was going to sleep until I knew the ending of Laura Griffin’s newest novel, Hidden.

If you’ve read any of Laura Griffin’s novels, you know that you should never get too attached to the person whose narration begins the book because this person is odds on favorite to have an early demise. As such, I tried not to care about the runner who was distantly stalking and crushing on Mr. Blue Eyes on her early morning run, except Griffin made her likable just by showing us this side of her. And then “poof,” she was gone.

Enter police detective Jacob and reporter Bailey. They click, but they are wary of each other. They are also very good at their jobs. I loved how they both proved their abilities throughout. How Bailey proved that reporters can be just as good at discovering information as police detectives.

There is a lot of tension and suspense throughout the novel that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat, which is one reason why I found the book so hard to put down. The exploration and ramifications of how facial recognition impinge on privacy is disturbing and real, although hopefully it isn’t to the extent that it is in the book. Yet. How can anyone slip from the grid if there are cameras on every street corner?

Griffin’s writing is inviting, so much so that the reader forgets that they are reading a novel.

If you’re a fan of thrilling police procedurals and mysteries, this one might just be for you!

I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.


rating:

4-and-a-half

4 butterflies and a ladybug out of 5 butterflies


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