Writing Reader Observation #6–Sentence Variety #amwriting #amreading

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I haven’t done this in a while, probably because I’ve had reader’s block. Have you ever had that? It’s especially bad when you have books to review. Woe, woe is me. 😦

Anyway, I hope it’s over as I’ve read two really lovely novels in a row, so I say: onwards!

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Writing Reader Observation #5

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Chit Chat

Specifics have been changed because I don’t remember them and I don’t watch the shows and to protect…well, there’s no innocent here so…onwards.

I recently read dialogue like this in a book calling itself romantic suspense. The conversation between three women revolved around a reality tv show.

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Writing Reader Observation #4: 5 Thoughts for Writers

“Just write every day of your life. Read intensely. Then see what happens. Most of my friends who are put on that diet have very pleasant careers.”
—Ray Bradbury

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Writing Reader Observation #2

“The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.”
—Samuel Johnson

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Lifestyle Interruptus

This is a two parter. Interruptions in thrillers and romances. Continue reading

Writing Reader Observation #1

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. ” ― Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

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Regardless of whether you’re a fan of Stephen King’s or not, his advice regarding reading is spot on. How can you be a good writer if you don’t read? It’s kind of like a writer’s apprenticeship. Reading shows you what to do and sometimes what NOT to do.

Today marks the start of what will be a semi-regular feature on the Microcosm. I’m going to share with you some observations, unfortunately mostly what-not-to-do’s, from the books that I’ve read while blogging.

 


The following is paraphrased from the novel I’m currently reading:

The character is on the phone. The British man says to her:

“We want to use the telly.”

My reaction when reading: what does their wanting to watch the tv have to do with her being on the phone?

Reading on I realize that the author thinks the British use “telly” to mean phone. They don’t. “Telly” refers to television.

Lesson Learned: Don’t use slang unless you are positive of the meaning; if nothing else, google. If you don’t want to do that, just use the term common to your own language.

As a writer you always want to maintain the “fictional dream,” which is interrupted when you use the wrong word.