Indie Versus Traditional Publishing

Even if you’re not a book blogger, but ARE a writer please read this post and/or if you’re not either and love to give your point-of-view join in.

So Friday evening I read Kim Knight’s post about book bloggers discriminating against Indie authors. You can read that post here. After just coming off of vacation where I tried to read two poorly written Indie novels, I admitted that I wasn’t surprised. A lot of us book bloggers are reading a lot and if you have to struggle through over-writing and description that consists of “he’s hot” and “she’s a hot mess,” you start to veer away from new (and even some established) Indie writers. Evidently for some book bloggers, it’s now a non-starter, which is the topic of Kim’s post.

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Head to Desk

for the 5000th time this year.

100 words written, read (no kidding) about 15 times, tweaked (a lot), published.

Come back 25 minutes later, reread and see: you’re for your.

Gremlins or fatigue…take your pick, but still a bruised forehead.

On another note, thanks to those of you who expressed your opinion on my color scheme. As you will have noticed, I am almost back to where I was last year at this time. Is that progression or regression?

 

🙂

Can’t Write Scared

dVerse~ Poets Pub OpenLinkNight #196

 

Can’t Write Scared

At university

the stoned poet said

“you can’t write scared”–

I continued

each word precisely penned

attuned to imaginary readers

whose lips curled derisively

on occasional lapses

of censorship.

I was an egg

concealed in a flimsy shell

like another half-dozen

cosseted caricatures

playing writer

spinning trite phrases

of sweet sounding words

imaginings of pink packaged

saccharine sentiment

but then I succumbed

to non-consumption.

∼∼∼∼∼

On rebirth I cried

“you can’t write scared”

and I didn’t, for a while

developed succinct style

of hewn craft on drafts

pinched words like pennies

wanted bennies, not

in my twenties anymore.

Fear pervades the core

bores into the brain

insane unremarkable drivel

pours through pores

I wrote scared

but scarred surfaces

surge upward

like polished wood

trampled on daily

til frailty exists no more.

 

5/18/2017

Sascha Darlington

(oops. I had farce in there, but deleted it.)

 

Writing Reader Observation #4: 5 Thoughts for Writers

“Just write every day of your life. Read intensely. Then see what happens. Most of my friends who are put on that diet have very pleasant careers.”
—Ray Bradbury

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Reflections of…the way life used to be* #atozReflections #atozchallenge

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A to Z Challenge Reflections

This was my first A to Z Challenge so it was quite an experience. Fortunately I have done nanowrimo and octpowrimo so I do have some experience with the task of writing everyday. It was very, very nice to have Sundays off though, which you don’t get with the other two challenges.

What made this a tremendous experience for me was finding fellow bloggers who were also doing the challenge. Some bloggers I’ve been reading for months and some were new to me, but I enjoyed reading their works progress through the month.

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Writing Reader Observation #2

“The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.”
—Samuel Johnson

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Lifestyle Interruptus

This is a two parter. Interruptions in thrillers and romances. Continue reading

Writing Reader Observation #1

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. ” ― Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

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Regardless of whether you’re a fan of Stephen King’s or not, his advice regarding reading is spot on. How can you be a good writer if you don’t read? It’s kind of like a writer’s apprenticeship. Reading shows you what to do and sometimes what NOT to do.

Today marks the start of what will be a semi-regular feature on the Microcosm. I’m going to share with you some observations, unfortunately mostly what-not-to-do’s, from the books that I’ve read while blogging.

 


The following is paraphrased from the novel I’m currently reading:

The character is on the phone. The British man says to her:

“We want to use the telly.”

My reaction when reading: what does their wanting to watch the tv have to do with her being on the phone?

Reading on I realize that the author thinks the British use “telly” to mean phone. They don’t. “Telly” refers to television.

Lesson Learned: Don’t use slang unless you are positive of the meaning; if nothing else, google. If you don’t want to do that, just use the term common to your own language.

As a writer you always want to maintain the “fictional dream,” which is interrupted when you use the wrong word.


 

The Next Time

You weren’t expected. Obviously.

His door is open. She’s giggling. You hear his soft laugh join hers. She’s leaning over his desk, supposedly pointing at data, but her blouse gapes open to show what little cleavage she has. He looks. Of course, he looks. She catches him and purses her lips, the smile still there. Her fingers reach toward his face and as they are about to caress his beard, you step in the room.

“The car’s broke down,” you say, jangling your keys.

She leans back, no apology in her eyes. The next time you’ll be on the interstate.

 

end 6/16/2016

©S. Darlington